Calendar

Events Calendar

February, 2019
  • Marc Weidenmier, Chapman University - Money, History and Finance

    "Bank Stocks and the Great Depression"

    02:30pm - 04:00pm | NJ Hall 101 | Coordinator: Michael Bordo

  • Keiko Kiyotaki, Princeton University - Money, History and Finance

    "Ottoman Land Reform in the Province of Baghdad"
    Posted - "Modification of the Land and Tax Systems",
    (Chapter 6 of book),

    02:30pm - 04:00pm | NJ Hall room 101 | Coordinator: Michael Bordo

  • Henrik Kleven, Princeton University - Empirical Microeconomics

    "The EITC and the Extensive Margin: A Reappraisal"

    02:00pm - 03:30pm | NJ Hall 3rd Floor Library | Coordinator: Anne Piehl and Amanda Agan

  • Stephen Luck, New York Federal Reserve - Money, History and Finance

    Click on name for paper

    02:30pm - 04:00pm | NJ Hall 101 | Coordinator: Michael Bordo

  • Barry Sopher, Rutgers University - Micro Theory/Experimental Seminar

    "Intertemporal Planning: Uncertainty and Opportunity Cost vs. Pure Time Preference"

    03:45pm - 05:15pm | NJ Hall 105 | Coordinator: Barry Sopher

March, 2019
  • Monica Deza, Hunter College - Empirical Microeconomics

    "The Effects of the Military Service on the Next Generation's Criminal Participation: Evidence from the Vietnam Draft Lottery"

    02:00pm - 03:30pm | NJ Hall 3rd Floor Library | Coordinator: Amanda Agan and Anne Piehl

  • Mary Rodgers, SUNY Oswego - Money, History and Finance

    "How J.P. Morgan Picked the Winners and Losers in the Panic of 1907: Resolving Adverse Selection and Restoring Surplus to a Frozen Deposit Market" (copy of paper below)

    02:30pm - 04:00pm | NJ Hall 101 | Coordinator: Michael Bordo

  • Oleg Itskhoki, Princeton University -  Macroeconomic Theory

    "Mussa Puzzle Redux"

    02:50pm - 04:10pm | NJ Hall 105 | Coordinator: Roberto Chang

  • Marcelo Medeiros, Pontifical Catholic University -  Econometrics

    "Counterfactual Analysis with Artificial Controls: Inference, High
    Dimensions and Nonstationarity"

    04:00pm - 05:30pm | NJ Hall 3rd Floor Library | Coordinator: Norman R. Swanson

  • Andrew Filardo, BIS/IMF - Money, History and Finance

    “The evolution of monetary policy frameworks – a case for leaning against the wind monetary policies”

    02:30pm - 04:00pm | NJ Hall 105 *Note change in room | Coordinator: Michael Bordo

  • Tomohiro Hirano, University of Tokyo (visiting Columbia University) -  Macroeconomic Theory

    "The Wobbly Economy"

    02:50pm - 04:10pm | NJ Hall 105 | Coordinator: Diego Anzoategui

  • Richard McLean, Rutgers University - Micro Theory/Experimental Seminar

    "A Folk Theorem with Communication for Repeated Games with Imperfect Private Monitoring"

    03:45pm - 05:15pm | NJ Hall 105 | Coordinator: Richard McLean

  • Owen Zidar, Princeton University - Empirical Microeconomics

    "Top Wealth in the United States: New Methods and Implications for Wealth Taxation"

    02:00pm - 03:30pm | NJ Hall 3rd Floor Library | Coordinator: Anne Piehl and Amanda Agan

  • Maarit Olkkola, (visiting) Princeton University - CANCELLED - Money, History and Finance

    "Infant and Maternal Mortality Decline - The role of pre-natal and well-child visits"

    02:30pm - 04:00pm | NJ Hall 101 | Coordinator: Michael Bordo

  • Zhifeng Cai, Rutgers University -  Macroeconomic Theory

    “Public Disclosure, Private Information Acquisition, and Complementarity: A Global-Games Approach”

    02:50pm - 04:10pm | NJ Hall 105 | Coordinator: Roberto Chang

  • Serguei Maliar, Santa Clara University - Micro Theory/Experimental Seminar

    "Will Artificial Intelligence Replace Computational Economists Any Time Soon?"

    03:45pm - 05:15pm | NJ Hall 105 | Coordinator: Oriol Carbonell Nicolau

  • Xuming He, University of Michigan -  Econometrics

    Paper - TBA

    04:00pm - 05:30pm | NJ Hall 3rd Floor Library | Coordinator: Yuan Liao

  • Ebonya Washington, Yale University, School of Arts & Sciences Distinguished Lectureship - Special Event Seminar

    "Voting Rights and Wrongs"

    04:30pm - 06:00pm | Academic Building, Room 1170, 15 Seminary Pl. (CAC) | Coordinator: Anne Piehl and Amanda Agan

April, 2019
  • James Masschaele, Rutgers University - Money, History and Finance

    Paper - TBA

    02:30pm - 04:00pm | NJ Hall 101 | Coordinator: Michael Bordo

  • Jesus Fernandez Villaverde, University of Pennsylvania, visiting Harvard University -  Macroeconomic Theory

    "Fictional Frictions and the Wealth Distribution"

    02:50pm - 04:10pm | NJ Hall 101 | Coordinator: Roberto Chang

  • Chad Bown, Peterson Institute for International Economics, Tangri Lecture - Special Event Seminar

    "Trade Policy in the Age of Trump"

    04:30pm - 05:45pm | New Brunswick Theological Seminary, 35 Seminary Pl., New Brunswick (CAC) | Coordinator: Thomas Prusa

  • Bradley Hardy, American University - Empirical Microeconomics

    "EITC Expansions, Earnings Growth, and Inequality: Evidence from Washington DC"

    02:00pm - 03:30pm | NJ Hall 3rd Floor Library | Coordinator: Anne Piehl and Amanda Agan

  • Eric Rauchway, UC - Davis, Dept. of History - Money, History and Finance

    "Roosevelt’s pre-inaugural commitment to inflation, 1932-1933”

    02:30pm - 04:00pm | NJ Hall 101 | Coordinator: Michael Bordo

  • Victoria Nuguer, Inter-American Development Bank -  Macroeconomic Theory

    "Domestic Financial Participation and External Vulnerability in Emerging Economies"

    02:50pm - 04:10pm | NJ Hall 105 | Coordinator: Roberto Chang

  • Yoonsoon Chang, Indiana University -  Econometrics

    Paper - TBA

    04:00pm - 05:30pm | NJ Hall 3rd Floor Library | Coordinator: Yuan Liao

  • Jared Rubin, Chapman University - Money, History and Finance

    “Political Legitimacy and the Institutional Foundations of Constitutional Government: The Case of England”

    02:30pm - 04:00pm | NJ Hall 101 | Coordinator: Michael Bordo

  • Diego Anzoategui, Rutgers University -  Macroeconomic Theory

    "(In)efficient Credit Booms in Frictional Credit Markets"

    02:50pm - 04:10pm | NJ Hall 105 | Coordinator: Roberto Chang

  • Yulong Wang, Syracuse University -  Econometrics

    “Nonparametric Sample Splitting”

    Abstract: This article develops a threshold regression model, where the threshold is determined by an unknown relation between two variables. The threshold function is estimated fully nonparametrically. Since the observations are allowed to be cross-sectionally dependent, our model can be applied to determine an unknown spatial border for sample splitting over a random field. The uniform rate of convergence and the nonstandard limiting distribution of the nonparametric threshold estimator are derived. The root-n consistency and the asymptotic normality of the regression coefficients are also derived. Empirical relevance is illustrated by estimating an economic border induced by the housing price difference between Queens and Brooklyn in New York City, where the economic border deviates substantially from the administrative one.

    04:00pm - 05:30pm | NJ Hall 3rd Floor Library | Coordinator: Yual Liao

  • Joshua Lewis, Yale University - Money, History and Finance

    “Effects of Environmental Regulation: The U.S. Electricity Sector, 1938-1999” (joint with Karen Clay, Akshaya Jha, and Edson Severnini)

    02:30pm - 04:00pm | NJ Hall room 101 | Coordinator: Michael Bordo

  • Diego Perez, New York University -  Macroeconomic Theory

    Paper - TBA

    02:50pm - 04:10pm | NJ Hall 105 | Coordinator: Roberto Chang

  • Naoki Yoshihara, University of Massachusetts - Amherst - Micro Theory/Experimental Seminar

    03:45pm - 05:15pm | NJ Hall 105 | Coordinator: Oriol Carbonell-Nicolau

  • Jia Li, Duke University -  Econometrics

    "Measuring China’s stock market sentiment"

    Abstract: This paper develops textual sentiment measures for China’s stock market by extracting the textual tone of 60 million messages posted on a major online investor forum in China from 2008 to 2018. We conduct sentiment extraction by using both conventional dictionary methods based on customized word lists and supervised machine-learning methods (support vector machine and convolutional neural network). The market-level textual sentiment index is constructed as the average of message-level sentiment scores, and the textual disagreement index is constructed as their dispersion. These textual measures allow us to test a range of predictions of classical behavioral asset-pricing models within a unified empirical setting. We find that textual sentiment can significantly predict market return, exhibiting a salient underreaction-overreaction pattern on a time scale of several months. This effect is more pronounced for small and growth stocks, and is stronger under higher investor attention and during more volatile periods. We also find that textual sentiment exerts a significant and asymmetric impact on future volatility. Finally, we show that trading volume will be higher when textual sentiment is unusually high or low and when there are more differences of opinion, as measured by our textual disagreement. Based on a massive textual dataset, our analysis provides support for the noise-trading theory and the limits-to-arbitrage argument, as well as predictions from limited-attention and disagreement models.

    04:00pm - 05:30pm | NJ Hall 3rd Floor Library | Coordinator: Yuan Liao

  • Kyung Park, Wellesley College - Empirical Microeconomics

    "Home Prices in Close Proximity to Mosques Before and After 9/11"

    02:00pm - 03:30pm | NJ Hall 3rd Floor Library | Coordinator: Anne Piehl and Anne Piehl

  • Alexander Field, Santa Clara University - Money, History and Finance

    "DO YOU BELIEVE IN MAGIC? THE PRODUCTIVITY CONSEQUENCES OF U.S. MOBILIZATION FOR WAR: 1941-48"

    02:30pm - 04:00pm | NJ Hall 101 | Coordinator: Michael Bordo

May, 2019
September, 2019
October, 2019
November, 2019
December, 2019

Upcoming Events

Mon Sep 16 @ 2:30PM - 04:00PM
Money, History and Finance
Killian Huber, University of Chicago
Fri Sep 20 @ 2:00PM - 03:30PM
Empirical Microeconomics
David Jaeger, CUNY
Mon Sep 23 @ 2:30PM - 04:00PM
Money, History and Finance
Zvi Eckstein, The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania
Fri Sep 27 @ 2:00PM - 03:30PM
Empirical Microeconomics
Hong Luo, Harvard Business School
Fri Oct 04 @ 2:00PM - 02:30PM
Empirical Microeconomics
Mike Cassidy, Rutgers University (Graduate Student)
Fri Oct 11 @ 2:00PM - 03:30PM
Empirical Microeconomics
Kihwan Bae, Rutgers University (Graduate Student)
Fri Oct 11 @ 2:00PM - 03:30PM
Empirical Microeconomics
Yutian Yang, Rutgers University (Graduate Student)
Fri Oct 18 @ 2:00PM - 03:30PM
Empirical Microeconomics
Suwei Luo, Rutgers University (Graduate Student)
Fri Oct 18 @ 2:00PM - 03:30PM
Empirical Microeconomics
Yilin Wu, Rutgers University (Graduate Student)
Mon Oct 21 @ 2:30PM - 04:00PM
Money, History and Finance
Sarah Binder, Georgetown University
Fri Oct 25 @ 2:00PM - 03:30PM
Empirical Microeconomics
Hyunjoo Ahn, Rutgers University (Graduate Student)
Fri Oct 25 @ 2:00PM - 03:30PM
Empirical Microeconomics
Yuanting Wu, Rutgers University (Graduate Student)
Mon Oct 28 @ 2:30PM - 04:00PM
Money, History and Finance
Kate Epstein, Princeton University